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How to help students from across Australia cope with post-traumatic stress disorder

How to help students from across Australia cope with post-traumatic stress disorder

Students with post traumatic stress disorder are often faced with challenging decisions.

One of the most important ones is whether to go on a course, or if they want to leave.

Many students with PTSD may find that they feel overwhelmed and unable to move on.

One student, who wished to remain anonymous, said she felt like she was “going to explode”.

“I’m really stressed, I don’t know what to do, I’m scared and I donĀ“t know how to deal with it,” she said.

“I feel really isolated.

I’m so sad.”

A survey conducted by the National Postgraduate Student Union (NPPSU) in 2018 found that nearly 70 per cent of students were experiencing post-trauma stress disorder at some point in their lives.

“We want students to be able to make a decision that is based on their wellbeing,” NPSU executive director of education, Pauline Burdick, said.

The survey also found that students with posttraumatic stress disorders were twice as likely to be diagnosed with anxiety disorders and three times more likely to suffer from depression.

In fact, about one in six students reported having some form of post-disaster stress disorder.

What you need to know about post-concussion syndrome What is post-conflict syndrome?

Post-confussion syndrome is the mental health impact of a traumatic event that occurs during a football match or other sporting event.

Symptoms include: flashbacks or images of the event